YourTechReport

B2BQuotes Connects Your Business with Qualified Professionals Quick

Episode Summary

It is more important than ever to be hiring qualified companies or people to help grow your business. B2BQuotes is a Montreal-based company that connects you to highly qualified professionals in all aspects of a business. This week we speak with co-founder Mathieu Plante all about the platform.

Episode Notes

It is more important than ever to be hiring qualified companies or people to help grow your business. B2BQuotes is a Montreal-based company that connects you to highly qualified professionals in all aspects of a business. This week we speak with co-founder Mathieu Plante all about the platform.

Transcript:

Marc Aflalo:
On the line with us is the co founder of a very cool company based in Montreal, called B2BQuotes, Mathieu Plante. Welcome to YourTechReport. Thank you so much for being on the line with us because during this pandemic it's fun to speak to people, quite honestly.

Mathieu Plante:
Well, thank you so much for having me. I'm excited.

Marc Aflalo:
Tell us about B2BQuotes, because this is a company that was brought to my attention by one of the PR agencies that we work with, and of course, I went on the website, I did my research, but I always love hearing about the company from the people who created it. You being a co founder, there's obviously a reason that this site was created. I'm curious, what was that reason? What was that defining moment that said, "Hey, we should create something that connects people here"?

Mathieu Plante:
Well, me and the other co founders, we've had businesses in the past and it's always a struggle to prioritize the different challenges and projects that we will do during a year, whether it's web or marketing challenges that we have. Are we going to do it in house? Do we have the right people to do it? Are we going to be hiring a referral from our friend, but then we don't know if it's the best match for our industry, our budget and everything like that. Then we can always go on Google, but then there's thousands of results and everybody you'll be speaking to, they'll always say, "Well, we're the best fit for you," but in the end we know that it's not the case.

Mathieu Plante:
In order to be able to navigate all of that, we decided to create B2BQuotes, which is a web marketplace that helps businesses get in touch with the most relevant suppliers for their web and marketing needs.

Marc Aflalo:
How do you define that? How do you define most relevant for their needs?

Mathieu Plante:
Right now we have 2,500 curated suppliers on the platform, 80% of them are agencies and 20% are freelancers. And then we have this algorithm that really helps us get the most relevant ones. There's a point system that we have in place, there's a thorough qualification that we do before onboarding suppliers. Only two out of three can actually get activated in the platform because of all these filters that we have to make sure that we really have good companies. And then they're able, in their accounts, to really get those hard filters, again, about the dual localization, the language, the services, the budget per services and all of that.

Mathieu Plante:
Now, the most important part really is the quality of the work they've done on the platform and with actual customers, and this will really bring their global notes up. Then we send the projects to the suppliers that are relevant, but also have the best quality score to the businesses.

Marc Aflalo:
Obviously there's two sides to this. There's, as a supplier or a freelancer, let's start there. I'm a supplier, let's say I'm a website designer or some kind of marketing agency. When I sign up for the service, what's the experience like? What kind of questions am I going to be asked that help qualify me?

Mathieu Plante:
Well, some of the questions are exactly what I just said, about what kind of services you're doing and all of that. Afterwards, to subscript to the platform, it's absolutely free of charge, and then you start seeing business needs that are relevant to whatever you're doing. You don't need to accept any of those, but at some point you'll say, "Well, that's exactly what I'm doing. I already have customers in that industry. I can really be of good value to them." Then you can accept the actual project.

Mathieu Plante:
The business model, how it works for the business, it's always free of charge, there is no engagement so that we can help them. Now for the suppliers, they pay us a referral fee in order to have access to qualified projects. Whenever you decided, "Well, this is exactly the kind of client that I can help," you accept it. Then there's up to four suppliers that can accept a project, in order for them to have a good chance of getting the deal, but also for the business so that they're not overwhelmed and flooded with 50 people wanting their business. That's the promise that we do.

Marc Aflalo:
That's impressive. Is it hand curated? Are there physical people who are going through every different bid, or is it all AI or algorithmic-based?

Mathieu Plante:
That's a really good question. We started doing everything personalized with actual humans, and then we added the filters and all of that. Right now we're part of an incubator called Next AI in Canada, that is helping us integrate AI also, just to, I guess, empower the humans behind. We're never going to be a humanless platform, but the idea is to really get even more relevant matches and even more faster matches for the businesses.

Marc Aflalo:
You said there's 2,500, was that 2,500 agencies on board or 2,500 businesses using the platform?

Mathieu Plante:
That's suppliers. Then we help over 4,000 businesses so far with the platform. The businesses that we help are really all kinds of ranges. To give you an idea, the smaller project that will activate on the platform is around $1,000, but the biggest one that we've had is $1.5 million. We'll help-

Marc Aflalo:
Now, is there a limited type of work? Because I noticed there's website design, marketing, mobile app, does it go with everything to even engineering?

Mathieu Plante:
Well, the aim for us is to be a one stop shop for every business service needs. We needed to start somewhere, we're only in our third year now, we're having good success in Quebec and in Ontario we're expanding. Some of the core services that we have right now, we started with web and marketing just because that was my background with agencies, and now we're adding services as we go. Right now the core services are website development, application development, whether you need help implementing a CRM or an ERP, web marketing in general, or marketing in general, corporative videos, branding design. And then you have PR, copy writing, translation and stuff like that. This is our core, there's 40 services in web and marketing, but now we're adding accounting services. We want to be able to help businesses with their real estate needs, whether it's to rent or to buy a place for their business, so on and so forth.

Marc Aflalo:
There really is no limit in terms of the size of, "I'm a small business and I need a logo design," for example. Where in my mind that's a small project, then I shouldn't hesitate because it's not just million dollar projects. It could be, "I just need someone to help me program something."

Mathieu Plante:
Exactly. We'll definitely help you and by asking the right questions. Because every time we always have a human talking to the business owner or to the marketing coordinator and really digging in. What is it exactly that they're looking for? And then we're able, with also our qualification, to direct you in the right place, because we have freelancers that will do small logos, but we also have smaller agencies, midsize agencies, huge agencies, and sometimes you can get a logo done for $500, but you can always get a logo done for $30,000. It really depends on what you're looking for, where you're at, and as far as branding goals, web marketing goals, website goals, there's different places. We're here to help you navigate all of that.

Marc Aflalo:
My advice, I guess, for people would be, if there's any business need you have, before you go anywhere else, go to B2BQuotes to check to see if you might be matched with someone who can do the job with great experience, and is curated really. Because there's so many sites out there where you can find developers, freelancers from all over the world. Some speak English, some don't speak English. Really, there's no real moderation there. Yes, there are reviews, but those don't necessarily accurately reflect what you're going to get at the end of the day. I always say you get what you pay for. Whereas this system really is curated. It helps quantify the type of work that you're going to get done.

Mathieu Plante:
Exactly. Most of the time with these other sites, you will get 10, 20, 30, even hundreds of results depending, and some of those people are just using the bazooka approach to really get jobs everywhere. Whereas on our platform, the suppliers will hand pick the projects that they really think they can nail and that's when they get matched. It's a more curated approach for sure.

Marc Aflalo:
Now you said the agencies and the freelancers, they're the ones paying the referrals. As a business, if you're seeking out agencies or freelancers, you're not going to pay anything. What kind of referral fee is it? Is it based on the size of the project? Is it a flat fee, a monthly fee?

Mathieu Plante:
To give you an idea, it's around 1% to 2% that we ask for the referral to up to four providers. We make 4% to 8% of the actual project, and the value of the project we will calculate it over the course of a year. Now, what will differentiate 1% to 2%, it will depend on the kind of service. Because let's say in web marketing, usually there's a good portion that will go to either Google or Facebook, that's the ad spent, so then we'll have a lower percentage because it's not the agency or the freelancer that will take all the money. Whereas developing an application, usually it's serviceable billable hours, then we'll go to the higher bracket, which is 2%, because the money is all going to the supplier.

Marc Aflalo:
That makes total sense. I'm curious, obviously we're living in the midst of a pandemic now, how has COVID-19 affected your business? Has it helped? Has it done nothing? What have you seen?

Mathieu Plante:
Actually, we definitely needed to pivot what we were doing. Before, we were taking 10, 15 minutes per businesses that were calling us or filling out forms to really activate their projects. Now we shifted that approach to really more of a consultant approach. I mean, the service is still free, there is no engagement, but we really took the time and we're still taking the time, that that will stay with us, to really deeply understand the business, to understand what kind of projects would they have to help them prioritize those, and then help them with their project brief and everything. COVID changed that for us because we had more time and we said, "Well, let's give more value to the business."

Mathieu Plante:
From there, I mean, a lot of opportunities came. We added new services like training for employees and businesses, HR services, also financial and financial help for businesses and stuff like that. That all came from COVID. Another aspect of it is that because all the businesses had to go online, or they would just hit a wall, a lot of them, we had a lot of businesses coming for eCommerce websites, web marketing needs and stuff like that. Actually, we doubled the business in the last three months. We're one of the lucky businesses with the COVID situation.

Marc Aflalo:
Listen, that's absolutely great. Let me leave you with this question, have you guys used the service yourself?

Mathieu Plante:
Of course, actually, we do it on a monthly basis. Every time we need help for either a video or some content, we have one of the supplier of the platform doing our Facebook ads, another one's doing our adwares. We also hired a branding agency there. John, that introduced us, is also on the platform as a PR supplier. Of course we use it everyday.

Marc Aflalo:
Very, very cool. Mathieu, thank you so much for taking the time to tell us about this. If you look five years down the road, how do you see the evolution of this platform?

Mathieu Plante:
That's a really good question. Actually, we bootstrapped the whole business so far, we got a little bit of depth and we have an angel investor, but we really are taking part in accelerators right now and are planning on raising our first round in six months from now, in order to really go faster and be an international business. We're currently doing proof of concepts in France, also in the rest of Canada, we're studying in the U.S. For sure, it's to be a global business that can really take care of every service needs that you have as a business.

Marc Aflalo:
Well, I think you've definitely got the formula set straight, and I think obviously with the success that you're showing, even in the times of a pandemic, is obviously a great sign. I wanted to wish you all the best. Please do come back and tell us about expansion, tell us about everything you're doing. I think I'm going to sign up now to become a supplier.

Marc Aflalo:
Still to come, we're going to speaking to Samsung all about their brand new laptop lineup. Check it out. It is your check report. Normally with Mitchell Whitfield, I am Mark Aflalo, back in just a moment.

Episode Transcription

Marc Aflalo:

We are back on YourTechReport. Thank you guys so much for being here. It is @YourTechReport on all our social media. Where you'll find lots of cool stuff. Anytime we talk about something here on the radio show, we tend to like to showcase it on our various social media platforms. And this next product we're going to be talking about is one that is close to home because I'm a big smart home fan. If you guys listen to the show and hopefully you guys do. Our next guest, his name is Ken Goto. He's the CTO of a company, Ken the company's Level Home, right?

 

Ken Goto:

The company is Level Home, correct.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Level Home, and this product. And I'll tell you guys a story here. Every once in a while, I search online as I'm doing research for new products. And I try to see what's coming out in the market. Because I've gone and leaned towards the HomeKit platform because my family is mostly iOS. I fell upon Level Lock. Now there are a lot of smart locks out there, and people who are trying various things when it comes to a lock. But Ken when it comes to the form factor of the way we think of smart locks, I think there's always a key pad on the outside. And then there's some kind of big bulky thing that sits on the inside. You got to change the batteries every couple months. And really you guys have taken things to a whole different level. And I want you to do your best because I know it's hard to describe physically, but describe physically the Level Lock to people. And then we'll get into the backstory and how this came to be.

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah. Yeah. So let's definitely talk about that. As you said, smart locks tend to be big, bulky, obvious things sitting on your door, holding batteries, circuit boards, all that stuff. Level Lock is basically invisible to your eye. Once it's installed, it looks like the lock you already had on your door. In fact, it is the lock you already had on the door. So the way we do that is you take your housings from your existing deadbolt. You take them off your door and inside that cavity, that's in your door, you've got a bolt that's there now. And it's taking up all that space. And what we do is we live inside that borehole entirely inside. So our motors, our gears, our boards, sensors, it's all in there. It's all in a two and an eighth inch diameter, less than an inch wide gap.

 

Ken Goto:

And then you take your housings that you just took off and you put them back on. And we go away. So the end result is suddenly, it's smart. It's funny when we were prototyping the product, I put it on my front door at my house and I'm sure you're familiar with this experience. I bring every piece of technology home, and most of the time it's a disappointment. And I usually have to hear it from my wife. "Can I just turn on a light? Can I work the stereo. I want to watch [crosstalk 00:02:50]."

 

Marc Aflalo:

Oh my God this is the last three months of my life.

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah, seriously. So I put it on our door. It was there for maybe three months before I actually said, "Hey, that thing I worked on it's in there. Do you want me to give you the iPhone app and it'll let you use it." It was just really interesting because we can meet people where they're at with technology. And in your home, you've got people who are. They're in different places in their life. Some people want to use a key they're old school. They don't want to mess with that. Other people, as you know, you're tethered to your phone, it's like part of your body. So we wanted to create this technology that was invisible, that just literally disappeared, so that it blends seamlessly with your daily routines.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Guys, I will post some videos and links in our social media. So you can really get a good view of how this works. And I think if you've ever installed any lock whatsoever. Your brain's going to click and go, "Oh my God, that is just genius." Because it really is. So now I really have to ask the question, where did this idea come from? Because there's always something that happens in the story of whether it's one of the founders, someone had something happened to them and it was born out of that, right?

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah, no, this is true. John Martin, my co founder and I, we've been passionate about the home space for the longest time we can remember. Your home is super sacred. It's where you greet your friends, and it's where your family is, and it's where you want to be safe. Especially now, these days where we're sheltering. So I think he and I both had a whole series of experiences where it's like, "This is really irritating. Why isn't there some technology in my home that makes my home welcoming. That makes my home easy to use, easy to access." And I know he had a particular story about there was one of our, sort of... When we were trying to sit down and figure out what area of the home we were going to tackle first. One of the stories he had was, he was on his way up to Tahoe to go to a place that they have up there with the family.

 

Ken Goto:

And they got stuck in the snow and all of this. And hours and hours, you probably have had that experience where you get trapped on the way to Tahoe. And two hours turns into six, seven. And they get up there. I don't know, middle of the night and he's got no keys to get in the house. And that's an awkward experience to have to go back to the wife and screaming children and basically say, "I'm not sure what we need to do. Maybe we'll asleep in the car." And it's frustrating. You think about maybe breaking your own window of your own house and things like that. So I know that that was one key thing that resonated with him. And I had a similar story and we both said, "You know what? Access." Access is a big deal because there are tons of products in your home that people are trying to make smart. And there's just lots of solutions looking for problems.

 

Ken Goto:

But then there are certain areas of the home that are demonstrably practical that you're running into daily. That really are a problem. And that was just one example. So we said, we got to do access. We've got to get you in your house.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Well, it's funny because probably about five years ago, I remember one of the first smart lock companies. And I'm sure you won't mind me mentioning competition it was August I think. And I remember having a conversation and one of the topics that came up in conversation was that the lock on that door, regardless of light bulbs and any other smart home devices you might think of, for some reason is the most sacred device in the smart home because it is it guards the entry to your home. Same thing when it comes to garage doors, because it's that entry to your home. So regardless of how you position it, you need to make sure that that device is foolproof. And there can't be any questions about it because no one's going to tamper with that. No one's going to change that unless they know that they're secure, can't be hacked, et cetera, et cetera. So I'm curious how in the messaging and how in the design of this product, you guys tackle that because it is a big deal.

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah, absolutely. And that's part of the interest in it for us, it's a high bar. You're either going to delight customers because it's something they're touching constantly through the day, their family's touching it or you're going to really disappoint. And we like that challenge. So for us, it was more than just saying, can we make something small and stuff it inside your door and have it be fragile. Have it really not live up to expectations. So for us, it was trying to come up with a design where we could achieve the same level of robustness of security as this big, giant, bulky things you see today. And we could even exceed them. If you take those things apart, they've got plastic gears inside. They're not built heavy duty.

 

Ken Goto:

If you take our stuff apart, you've got stainless steel gears. You've got just very, very specific material selection and composition. There's a tremendous amount of thought that goes into it to ensure that we can achieve the same or better level of physical security, of durability, of performance as something that is just dramatically bigger. When we show it to people and we go and inside and tear it down a little bit. It's almost mind boggling. They just can't believe that we could have achieved that in that form factor.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Well, I guess, it's like, it's when you look at smartphones and just even computers, miniaturization, obviously over time, it's important because you're trying to get more bang for your buck. And you're trying to obviously fit more in a smaller space. So tell me about how long this process, excuse me, how long this process took. Because this can't be just, "Oh, we thought about this and when we came to market in a couple of months from now." So it's obviously quite some years in the making. So I'm curious, how long ago did you start? When did this idea first start, and how on earth do you fit everything? Battery alone takes up an enormous amount of space in such a small design.

 

Ken Goto:

It does. It does.

 

Marc Aflalo:

How do you fit what you need to in there and make it last?

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah, absolutely. So as far as the R&D, I would say we took a solid two years. Company's been around for four years, just had an anniversary a couple of days ago.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Congratulations.

 

Ken Goto:

Thank you. Thank you. I would say we were in foundational R&D for about two years. Really trying to figure out going from large form factor, prototypes, concepts, all the way down through a series of cycles until we could get it into a form factor. And then from there you're constantly testing, you're constantly validating, you're constantly reworking to be able to meet all of these conflicting expectations. Because the size fights with strength, and durability, performance, and cost and manufacturability. So there are a lot of horizontally opposed goals. So I would say it took a solid two years of R&D before we got to the formula that let us know we got it, we got the product.

 

Ken Goto:

And then, from there, there's another couple of years, a little less. Where we have to basically get it ready for manufacturing and bring it out to scale, launch the product, build the rest of the company. And that's what the remaining time has been spent on. In addition to other products on the roadmap that we're also working on that are coming out later. As far as how we pack things down like that, a lot of the team, especially the core team back at that point, we all came from Apple. We're used to trying to find elegant compact solutions.

 

Ken Goto:

There are components we use where, for example, a piece of electronic component we're using for three, and four and five different capabilities, where someone else might think of five discrete components for doing that. So there's just a lot of areas where we try to condense things down. We try to be really creative and clever about how we package things together that lets us do that. You've mentioned the battery, the battery is an example. You've been looking at the website, but have you figured out where the battery is?

 

Marc Aflalo:

I have figured out what the battery is because I'm that ingenuine. And I don't even know what the word is, but, no, the battery is in the actual bolt itself.

 

Ken Goto:

It is, it is, it is right. Because once you put all this together and it's all invisible, you want to be taking housings off every year to go change batteries and things. It's a common question. It's like, "Well, okay, it's invisible but now how do I change a battery?" So we put it in a bolt, which takes a tremendous amount of engineering to figure out how you make a battery go into something that needs to be strong and durable, something that moves mechanically, but also it needs to stay connected electrically. So there's a lot to it to package it together. It's definitely a system. It's not thought about in pieces. And a lot of that just has to do with the way that we sort of the ethos of the company and how we engineer things. It's just a rigorous process of prototyping, validation, prototyping, validation, until we really zero in on the right end solution.

 

Marc Aflalo:

We talk to a lot of people in different companies, and we normally talk to them when a products now available in the market or coming out in the market. And other people have had hands on time, but we really asked the question. In describing this four year process, I'm curious, I'm sure there were ups and downs. Were there any points in time where you said to yourself, or you guys looked at each other, you and John said, "This isn't going to work." Or you felt really kind of down yourselves before there was some kind of breakthrough.

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah. I would say obviously with any engineering you run into hiccups, you run into hitches. I have to say. And it sounds strange because it sounds like that can't be real. I don't think we ever hit a point where we thought we had a barrier that was not something we could overcome. And I'll give you a reason why. And this again, gets to the ethos of how we design. When we think about doing a product, a lot of people look at what's out there and they try to make a better mousetrap. They try to bolt on, they try to take that approach. You can see that in the smart locks today. The inside of the doors occupied. So we're on the outside. Now I got to have this. It just gets bigger and bigger.

 

Ken Goto:

And you end up with more and more compromises because as an example, a regular bolt for a deadbolt is mechanically very difficult to turn. If you tried to turn it with your finger without the power just in your hand, the amount of force required to do that is really large. And so imagine a little tiny motor gearbox battery having to do that, having to push that old bolt, that old technology from the 1930s. So for us, the way we design is we always go back... We go to a place we call square zero. It's not square one, it's square zero it's before that. We really want to understand what the customer's trying to achieve. What is it they really want independent of technology, independent of the can we do it sort of thing. And we'd like to start there, and then we build up from there.

 

Ken Goto:

And what that ends up doing is it's counterintuitive. It opens up more design paths for every particular step of the way. So it actually allows us to have more paths, where if we do hit a hitch with one direction, "Oh, there's three other ways we can shift now." We're not boxed in in that way. So it's given us a lot of flexibility. For example, once we chose to replace that core bolt that lets us be inside the borehole. So then that opened up all the possibilities. Now instead of trying to be outside, trying to figure out how to make our box on the outside, smaller, less noticeable. Well, we're inside now. So now we already have taken care of that. When we redesigned the bolt, we get to make a bolt that's incredibly smooth and efficient.

 

Ken Goto:

So it takes very, very little power to move that bolt back and forth. Because we get to design that fresh. We don't have to take on the burden of the previous bolt. So you end up allowing yourself to get past things that might've been a problem. Like battery life would be an obvious problem for a smart lock. And it is a problem for most smart locks. But because we've made these other changes, suddenly battery life isn't a big issue for us because all our pieces and the way things move are so efficient, so low friction, we don't run into that problem. So we either avoid certain problems that everyone steps into, or when we do get near that problem space, we have two or three paths we can take.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Yeah. A couple of months ago before Apple, and Google, and Amazon announced this smart home alliance where they're going to start open sourcing a bit of HomeKit. There was a choice you had to make, which was, what do we make this compatible with? And you guys obviously took the HomKit approach. I think the DNA in your blood probably helped define that. But was there any other factors that helped point you in that direction?

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah. I mean, to your point the ecosystems are converging. Maybe a year or two out with that grouping coming together, they'll all unify on one platform, which would be great for consumers. But right now, right now we had to pick. We had to make our choices. As a small company we had to, basically, decide which one we were going to invest in first. And HomeKit is a great ecosystem. The integration is great. Apple, of course, you're familiar with HomeKit. You're familiar with Apple obviously. So the way their products integrate together, the way they tie in, the way it's seamless, it's definitely in line with our ethos of design, and simplicity, and user experience. So for that reason, it was a pretty obvious choice for us to start with. And yes, Apple DNA, Apple familiarity, that certainly was a factor as well.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Now, I make the assumption sometimes that people know completely what a smart lock does. But there obviously is an app that goes along with this that obviously ties things together. Other than obviously using HomeKit. Is there anything specific other than obviously unlocking and locking, and setting codes that sets your software side apart from everybody else?

 

Ken Goto:

Yeah. I think there's a couple of things that are unique about what we do. Level Lock is a Bluetooth lock. So normally speaking, it's a local lock. It's not connected to the cloud, for example, all the time, unless you have a hub, et cetera. But your phone is connected. Our phones are connected to the internet pretty much everywhere all the time. So we do certain things where we actually leverage your phones uplink for communication, for sharing of invitations, et cetera. You can share an invite to someone else that person could come up to the door. And that invite's actually going to process and work for that user locally, without that lock having to have had an internet connection up to the cloud. So we do a lot of things along those lines. We also have user based features around things like Party Pass.

 

Ken Goto:

Where I'm sure you've had the situation where you've got people coming over, and people are ringing your doorbell. No one can hear them you're out on the deck or whatever. And they're calling you like, "I'm outside. Let me in." So we said let's make this Party Pass feature. Let's make an easy way for you to create a pass that you can easily share through your social networks or email, or what have you, and get that to someone else. And then that person shows up at the door, and the door just welcome them in. And so that's a another example of a feature that's unique to what we do.

 

Marc Aflalo:

That's very cool. I like that a lot, especially, with the summer weather here. I've experienced that about five or six times probably in the past week. I have some more questions for you because you said something off the top, but before I dive into those. Tell me about availability of Level Lock where can people get it when, price point, et cetera, et cetera.

 

Ken Goto:

Yes. So Level Lock is available from level.co our website that you went to. It's also available through certain pro channels and distributors. There's a variety of places that home builders, et cetera, can purchase a Level for their builds that they're doing, et cetera. But for end user customers, it's through level.co right now. And the retail price is 229.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Awesome. Okay. So here's what I wanted to get because you had mentioned something about when we first started this conversation, about what was the first product that you guys were going to be tackling. So clearly, clearly, you guys have a mission and there's other things in the smart home that you're going to be going after. Are there any other products that you can tell me in the pipeline, or give me a indication as to where Level might be going? No, is an okay answer by the way. It's okay to say no.

 

Ken Goto:

I can't tell you about other products in the pipeline. I can definitely tell you that. Yes. You touched on it correctly. The company name is Level Home. It's not Level Lock. We are passionate about the home. There are so many areas of innovation in the home, and we really believe that these problems can be solved. And a company with our ethos can tackle those. So there are several other areas of the home we're super interested in, but as a startup we're going to stay focused. So I'm going to say no.

 

Marc Aflalo:

I like it. I like it a lot. Ken, awesome time talking to you. Thank you so much for taking the time to come on. I am very excited. I'm going to go to the site right now and buy one because your PR agency said they wouldn't send one. So I'm going to go buy one.

 

Ken Goto:

What.

 

Marc Aflalo:

I know. It's okay. Listen, demand. I understand there's demand. No, but I'm definitely, I'm looking forward to getting hands on because I love to follow up interviews. Especially the first time and really show our listeners on our YouTube channel. How easy it is to install. And I'm looking forward to it because I've been watching a lot of the videos. And you guys can go to youtube.com, just look up Level Lock. The reviews you're getting are phenomenal. People are loving this lock they're calling it's, obviously, the invisible HomeKit smart lock, incredible impressions. I'm very excited to get hands on, congratulations on the success because this is going to be a great product. If this is any indication of what's down the road for you guys. I'm really looking forward to it. So thanks again for coming on. And it was great talking to you.

 

Ken Goto:

Absolutely. Thanks Marc. And thanks for taking time to talk about Level. We're super excited and looking forward to hearing more from you after you get your lock.

 

Marc Aflalo:

Oh, you will hear.